BONDAGE SAFETY

In regards to safety, kinbaku is no different than any other power exchange in that one party accepts responsibility (at least to some degree) for the safety and wellbeing of the other. While the model retains the responsibility to clearly and accurately communicate their needs and concerns with the Rigger, especially when it pertains to their own body, it is ultimately the responsibility of the Rigger to ensure the overall safety of their ropework.
Unfortunately, despite having adequate training and skills, the proper equipment, and the best-laid plans, accidents can still happen to the best of us. While emergency situations do not always indicate a fault on behalf of either party, prior preparation and an adequate response are critical. Do not wait until you find yourself in a situation to start figuring out how to get out of it.

The basics of bondage safety equipment:

One is none, two is one! You can never have too many safety devices.

Always ensure that your safety equipment is in good working order prior to beginning any scene. Periodic maintenance, including resharpening, is an essential part of proper upkeep.

Keep all safety equipment readily accessible and free from obstruction for the duration of the scene. If you keep your safety equipment in their pocket, avoiding tucking it in completely as this will make it more difficult to extract when needed. Likewise, if you prefer to keep your safety equipment free on a table or on the floor, regardless of where you place it, make sure it is clearly visible and never more than a single step away.

Make sure that everyone involved in the scene knows where each piece of safety equipment is located, and what their responsibilities are in the event of an emergency.

Never use pointed implements (e.g. knives, scissors, etc) when cutting a model out of rope. Panic is the vulture that sits on your shoulder. Regardless of the experience and skill level of all parties involved, emergency situations are stressful. While it’s true that some handle stress better than others, inevitably stress leads to mistakes, and no one wants to add an accidental stab wound visit to the ER on top of an already otherwise damaged scene.

EMT sheers are generally the most often used safety equipment for cutting a model out of rope. This is primarily due to their blunted tips which prevent gouging while still maintaining a razor-sharp cutting edge. However, we can not stress enough the importance of spending the extra money to get a pair with a quality fastener, as cheaply constructed EMT shears all share the same fatal flaw in that they are held together with a single rivet which can blow out when placed under tension, thus causing the shears to fail when you need them the most.

Rescue Hooks and seatbelt cutters can be an acceptable substitute for those looking for a static alternative to EMT shears.

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